Skip to content

Adapting to Change

WebsterKirkwood Times March

Facebook in  April

Can these Wild temperature changes in St. Louis this spring affect the growth of your plants? Of course! Will it hurt it? Not if the plant is healthy! Native plants are perhaps the best able to survive unscathed, but it is still survival of the fittest.

In Spring, plants send sap up from the Roots to begin expansion of buds and leaf growth. Sap might freeze causing Frost cracks. Expanding buds might freeze and young leaves destroyed, especially plants like our new witchhazel–A very early bloomer. But it looks great!

Eons ago plants learned to go off in different directions when the boss bud–the terminal bud–is destroyed. Hormones go wild. You probably will need to go into the shrub interior with a Clean, Sharp, Bypass pruner and reduce the competition and direct the growth of the branches.

Look for infections along frost cracks on The Twig. They may appear as an elliptical shape. Remove the twig or cautiously prune back to clean wood and a healthy bud. It is a great excuse to get up close and personal with your plants. TV’s Myth Busters showed that plants definitely respond well to communication — even being yelled at.

Charlotte Schneider 314-363-2040

40 years Missouri Forester, Certified Arborist

Internat’l Soc. Of Arboriculture

 

April 9, 2018

Tree Planting Challenges

TME jpg my treehis is a great time to plant trees, both deciduous–those without leaves in the winter– and evergreen trees and shrubs. Roots will grow anytime the soil temperature is above 40oF.

The St Louis Arborist Association recommends planting a variety of trees to better keep the urban environment healthy. As Certified Arborists (CA) we recognize production nurseries wrap new tree roots in burlap and wire to keep the dirt and roots together for transportation. Burlap may be impregnated with materials restricting water and root movement out of the ball. And the basket wires that do not degrade, restrict lateral root development. The planting hole may be too narrow or too deep. Often new trees are strangled at the root collar.

Certified Arborists of The St. Louis Arborist Association (SLAA) are available to help homeowners alleviate some of the problems that have developed as a result of improper planting and many also plant trees for homeowners.

Charlotte Schneider, CA

member SLAA

 

Female Forester Forever – Time to PRUNE? – February 27, 2018

UAR rivvvbrchA couple nice days in late winter gives us a chance to observe our trees. Without the leaves they expose their ‘bones’. This is a good time to prune before spring brings insects and diseases, but if you are cutting branches 4″ and larger sap will probably bleed now.

Broken, hanging branches, will rip the bark. Branches that are overlapping, if they are close to other branches where they will rub when the wind blows, need to be corrected. Cankers on branches often manifested in an elliptical shape, are signs of the trees’ response to insect damage and fungal or bacterial invasion.

Look around. Do you have branches heading toward your roof? Better to prune, directing growth in a safer direction. Middle of summer is another great time to prune. Certified Arborists have the training to make good decisions on large trees to avoid future problems. The members of the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) are available. They can also advise you on how to train your young trees.

Charlotte Schneider Certified Arborist

40+ years a Missouri Forester

Certified Arborist since 1998.

 

314-363-2040

Distributor American Dream Nutrition

PhytoZon® Thank You God

Female Forester Forever – Sweetgum, Nuisance Or Not – January 10, 2018

20180110_091852_resized - Copy20180110_091911_resized - Copy20180110_091830_resized - CopyNuisance Or Not

They are everywhere… cluttering the sidewalks, the streets, and the lawns. They are big and potentially dangerous. Why??? They have been over planted by landscapers.

Sweetgum, Liquidambar styraciflua, is a Child of the Forest — a 200-ft. want-to-be growing on compacted, clay soils. It’s slow growth forces it to squeeze together all its branches. It is under a lot of stress resulting in a Survival-of-the-Species mode… resulting in more and more fruit. Topping or ‘lion’ tailing of branches may seem to help for a while, but it causes lots of sprouts and a lot more stress in the long run.

In my 40-plus years as a Forester I have learned that reducing stress is the key. A good Certified Arborist can cautiously reduce the number of branches, t h u s reducing fruit production, and advise you on ways to keep everybody happy. Members of the St Louis Arborist Association are available. Consult with them and plan ahead.

Charlotte Schneider, Missouri Forester 40+yrs

Certified Arborist since 1998.

Member St. Louis Arborist Association

and Internat’l Soc. of Arboriculture

Author Female Forester Forever

Distributor American Dream Nutrition

PhytoZon Thank You God

Share if you Care

Female Forester Forever – Replacing Lost Beauty–November 23, 2017.

IMG_4091IMG_4071IMG_400420171108_205624_resizedAs a Forester cruising The Woodlands of Missouri, I very occasionally found this beautiful Vine and flowers in the woods–American bittersweet, Celastrus scandens. I had been told that it was nearly extinct in Missouri because people had cut it 4 Christmas displays. Be sure to avoid oriental bittersweet, Celastrus orbiculatis

The fruits I saw in the woods were a vibrant red about a half inch long surrounded by the orange seed coats that were folded back to expose the seed. Back in the city at a nursery I was thrilled 2 find a hybrid plant at a reasonable cost. It needed to be a hybrid because naturally maie and female flower parts are on separate plants– dioecious plant. I certainly did not have room to plant two Vines.

Mine had flowers such as pictured but nothing like what this lady brought in at The Plant Doctor Desk. My vine has been beautiful and someday maybe.

But I certainly did enjoy the way the vines could be encouraged to wrap around each other as you can see in this picture of the vine embracing my neck. Obviously my plants love love me also.

Share if you Care

Charlotte Schneider 314-363-2040

Distributor American Dream Nutrition

PhytoZon® Thank You God

Author Female Forester Forever

Author Our Little Urban Arboretum–A Diary

Blog: urbanarboretumdiary.wordpress.com

Blog: msprimaryprogressive.wordpress.com

 

Female Forester Forever – Fall Is 4 Planting – October 27, 2017

20161124_104113Digital StillCameraThe peak of fall color a bit late but our weather has been splendid so far. This is a wonderful time of year to plant deciduous trees and shrubs.

When using bare-root stock be sure to spread the roots out laterally. You don’t want to stick cause a ‘J’ formation. When using balled and burlapped, remove the wire basket or cut it down 18 inches. Cut the burlap’s tie around the trunk and push the burlap down 18 inches into the planting hole.

Dig a wide planting hole, twice the width of the ball. Rough up the sides if you have clay soil… likely in the St. Louis area. Ball should stand on firm ground no deeper than the original root collar, which may be hard to find. Don’t radically amend the soil you put back into the hole, roots won’t want to leave their home hole. Tamp down the soil and fill to the root collar… don’t mound dirt or mulch against the trunk. Mulch to the drip line, 2-3 inches deep is plenty throughout the year. Roots below ground will grow whenever the soil is over 40 degrees.

If you have a tree showing exposed burlap, girdling roots, or no root color at all, contact a Certified Arborist and see what can be corrected for the safety of the tree and environment.

If you need suggestions on what to plant check the Missouri Botanical Garden Kemper Center website. Establish a sustainable landscape. The St. Louis Arborist Association arborists can consult on landscape determination as well as tree care. Trees, Birds and other animals are looking for a forever home in your yard. Let it be a happy home for them and you.

Charlotte Schneider 314-363-2040

Distributor American Dream Nutrition

PhytoZon® Thank You God

Author Female Forester Forever

Author Our Little Urban Arboretum–A Diary

Blog: urbanarboretumdiary.wordpress.com

Blog: msprimaryprogressive.wordpress.com

314.363.2040

Female Forester Forever – Immune System and Self-defense — People and Trees –

posted September 29, 2017

 

20170723_102800S20170723_102234o

20170829_103150_HDR20170723_102811_resizedhow do trees protect themselves from disease? Whether it be physical damage from people or insects or weather, trees are always dealing with the advance of diseases that invade wounds.

Trees send chemicals to the infection site much like our bodies send white blood cells to an infection site. Chemicals there accumulate setting up a barrier much like our body part swells and becomes inflamed. The main difference is our bodies were created to be able to heal themselves. However trees are known to not heal but only to seal off the wound sites.

At The Invasion Site there will be a continuing progression of invading diseases. These struggles are ‘written’ in the tree rings with dark rings and discoloration surrounding the infection site, proceeding not only in toward the heartwood, but up and down in the phloem and xylem.

How well the tree can withstand this progression of diseases is based on getting the proper nutrition. That is so much like our own bodies. I have considered pouring PhytoZon and Pure AquaMins Etc. over tree roots, but there are so many of them and they are so big. I think I’ll just concentrate on people, including myself of course.

I have been in a quandary how to approach this on Facebook. I am proud to be able to introduce you to our alternative medicine marketed through people-to-people contact. It helped my body rebuild my immune system to levels I have probably not experienced since birth. I am 70 and dealing with an autoimmune disease, primary Progressive multiple sclerosis for 33 years, and I am amazed .

Charlotte Schneider 314-363-2040

40 years Missouri Forester, Certified Arborist

Distributor American Dream Nutrition

314.363.2040

Share if you Care

Donate Today

Source: Donate Today

How to Donate

Source: How to Donate

20170911_155749_HDR - Copy (2).jpg20170911_155257 - Copy20170911_155039_HDR - Copy20170911_155039_HDR - Copy (2)Heptacodium miconioides can thrive in zones 5 to 9. This beautiful tree blooms prolifically in September with basketball sized clusters of flowers. This seven son flower tree is welcome here, blooming when migrating monarch butterflies are thirsty.

As a Missouri Forester I am amazed how trees can adapt and thrive in conditions foreign to their genealogy. But considering they have been surviving for a few hundred million years, I guess it shouldn’t be a surprise

They have taught me well. We do have an advantage over trees though, we can not only pick up our roots and move but we can think. I have learned dealing with PPMS that I need more from the environment I grew up in. I need lots of antioxidants to counteract all the free radicals in my body. I need phytonutrients and minerals to supplement my diet because many plants no longer provide adequately.

I certainly urge you to research. Question what is on the shelves at the stores. Question what is on the websites. Question what is marketed to you. And question what is prescribed to you.

Charlotte Schneider 314-363-2040

40 years Missouri Forester, Certified Arborist

Author Female Forester Forever

Distributor American Dream Nutrition

PhytoZon Thank You God

Share if you Care